Magnificent Montréal

Founded on an island by the French in the 17th century on the confluence of the Rivers Ottawa and St. Lawrence is the Canadian city of Montréal. An incredible amalgamation of cultures cut a new identity in this modern Canadian landscape. What was once an economic powerhouse Montréal is now associated the harmonising of English and French speaking communities despite their obvious cultural differences. You’d think that there would be rigid divisions between these communities, but they’re one proud city.

 

I won’t focus on the cultural aspects but on old and new Montréal. I will be brief on the new as it is not my cup of tea. It possesses many of the issues seen all too frequently around the world -pollution, waste, drugs, ignorance, commercialisation and globalisation. I don’t know what the problems were when the new Montréal was built, but to be digging most of it up illustrates that planning and wastefulness is not a modern phenomenon. So lets put to bed my disdain of this area and focus on the area I loved.

Old Montréal has somehow managed to retain its character. The old town was established as a catholic village along the banks of the St. Lawrence river. Missionary efforts failed to flourish meaning it needed a new way to survive. That came, as so many places in Canada, through fur-trading. The wealth and prosperity that particular boom brought meant that fine stone buildings and houses were built. Montréal also established one of the most important inland harbours in North America by the 19th Century. Booms don’t and can’t last forever – world history testifies to that. Montreal was no exception. By the 20th century the city had fallen into decline. From 1980 the city has had its own renaissance. Many of the 18th century buildings were saved and given a new lease of life for what was built back then no longer fitted in with what is needed today.

What there is now is a remarkable combination of old and new, as restaurants, bistros and boutiques merge with wonderful architecture. Yes, you still have your tourist shops, littered with ‘Canadian’ products made in China. My suggestion is to search for and buy the authentic Canadian goods that may be found on the shelves. A conversation ensued with the shop keeper, but I soon ran out of what little French I know though not before he had accepted payment from my credit card. It was then that he changed to English to say something about his wife once working for English speakers.

Canada doesn’t do the “pubs” to which I am accustomed. Invariably the establishments that exist are bar/restaurants with the main focus on food. I had some puzzled looks as I would just enter and only want a beer. One must indulge in some of Montreal’s cuisine, poutine and (a recommendation) a smoked meat sandwich.

The architecture is similar to that in Quebec City (French influence) and was a pleasure to study. The Notre Dame Basilica is worth the entrance fee. As you step into this cathedral, be amazed by the almost ocean looking sanctuary and altar piece. The cathedral probably survives on those entrance fees and not from contributions from regular and faithful attendees. It is the same the world over but aren’t we glad that these places are preserved even if they resemble museums and sometimes even mausoleums. Down the rue Notre-Dame (one could be mistaken for thinking one was in Paris) the Hôtel de Ville captures your attention before Montréal’s own Nelson’s column takes your eye. Ignore the wonderful street entertainers, (for a second you might think you were in Covent Garden in London) and question why it is that one of England’s most famous seamen has a statue there. This evidence confirms the sense of intertwined cultures that have shaped this city.

The aforementioned harbour is no longer the trading post it once was. Now it has undergone serious modernisation as the entertainment features that the youth of today crave have sprung up to ensure its sustainability. A railway line runs parallel with the river and splits the glorious old town from this modern hub of craziness. An entrance to Chapelle Notre Dame-de-Bonsecours provides a view of this divide between the harbour and old Montreal. As you stand there and look across old Montreal you could be mistaken for thinking that you are looking across a city in Europe, as spires, domes and religious buildings dominate the skyline.

Before I left this city, there were still two places that I felt must be visited. A walk to Mont Royal and Oratoire Saint Joseph. I’d been to both before, but both places should be considered on a first visit to the city. On arriving in the city in glorious sunshine I dumped my bags and hiked up “la montagne”. This urban escape provides Montrealers with some much-needed green space in the city. Standing at only 234m high, nature manages to provide the city’s best view point. Oratoire Saint Joseph is perhaps the perfect spot to watch the sunset in the city. After climbing the 283 steps to the top I sat amazed as the sun set. Witnessing behaviour that perhaps wasn’t in tone with the location, it was still a romantic end for my visit to the city.

I’d been before, but Magnificent Montréal, you were worth the second visit.

Jasper Jewel

Is this the jewel in Canada’s crown? Jasper – what a place! We visited this place more than once on this trip. We stopped at Jasper on the railway odyssey, but this stop was extended somewhat as we arrived ahead of schedule. This stopover gave a glimpse of what was to come. We made our way back by car to make a stay and what had been earmarked as a potential favourite destination of the trip certainly became that.

Set in the heart of the Rockies, this gentle and timeless town is an absolute winner. It exhibits an endless alpine landscape of opportunity and, oh, how I wish that I had had more time! Those hiking tracks, river activities and wildlife wonders needed more time than I had allocated. How lucky Canadians are to have it as their backyard!

Stunning mountains dominate the skyline, beautifully covered in snow. How refreshing compared with, apparently, the modern, global appeal of skyscrapers and bright lights. Give me nature’s view over a cityscape every time. Whether it is snow on the peaks or the remains of glaciers I’ll leave that for the experts. What I do know is the destruction of these incredible formations caused by the human race. I must appreciate what is left behind as it is spell binding and strive to do something about preserving it.

Canada is blessed with lakes; Jasper is no different. Some of them are fed by glaciers. These lakes have the most exquisite turquoise-coloured waters. I managed to finally see these wonderful colours walking around lake Annette where the ice had melted. I also found lots of frozen lakes as we were in Canada early in the season.  Between the lake and the snow of mountains lie the vast amount of wildlife and trees, which, until you look closely or walk through them, you do not realise the multitude of trees that are there. It is a mind-blowing amount. It was great to see them all standing proud knowing full well that some, perhaps not these particular ones, will be used for building purposes. I thought of the years that it took for these to grow. Sustainability is the key. Hidden among them is a vast array of wildlife. Whisper it quietly, because if you are there you never know what you might see!

I’m ashamed to admit that our journeys into Jasper were by both train and car. Coupled with the plane journey to get to Canada in the first place we have contributed to the damage caused to this planet. Motivation and inspiration should be taken from two crazy souls who were passed on the Iceland parkway. They were cycling to Jasper. They certainly challenged me to think about future trips and how they can be more of an adventure and exploration rather than a tick box exercise to visit as many places as possible. To what extent have I joined in with those who jump out of coaches to take a photo and jump back in again for the next shot. Time is something more valuable than money, and the one thing that beats us all. Time management to give to and to get the best out of life is a real issue as far as I am concerned. We are here to enjoy what we see but to do so responsibly. A reassessment of the way I travel perhaps should be done to make me minimise my footprint on the world. Food for thought.

I shall leave you with some thoughts about my visit which were noted as I sat and looked at that view.

For a moment I felt a sense of freedom
The evils of a modern world – greed, power,
Destruction, globalism, commercialism –
Abated as nature presented a calming distraction

It takes more than a moment to appreciate the view,
Solace found in a wonderful yet peaceful landscape.
And how one views the scene depends on the viewer –
God’s creation or years of formation

As the shoots of spring were forming
The sun was shining
The birds were returning
The snow was melting

The sound of flowing water
Didn’t disturb the peaceful harmony
Birdsong the angelic voices that
Drowned the heavy beats of my heavy heart

The more you look the more you appreciate
But for how long will we be able?
Whisper it quietly for surely
It won’t be here for much longer

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Niagara Galls

The next stop on my railway odyssey took me back to Niagara Falls. I shouldn’t have put myself through the pain and expense of travelling there again for once you have seen them, you have seen them. I mean they haven’t changed in the 3 years since I was last here. It is true to say that they are powerful falls, but they seemed slightly debilitated, perhaps by the freezing ice and snow (still around at the end of April). The falls seemed crestfallen as though their aura and might had been negated. A sense of slumber hung around the area. We had heard and read from fellow travellers that the sound of the mighty power of the falls may be heard from miles away and we listened out as we walked from the train station. Was the expected noise missing due to the snow and ice on the falls? Did the ice in effect reduce the distance that the water had to fall or dampen or deaden its impact? Was the noise lost to the hubbub of the town coming to life after a winter of hibernation? Other people had come to see the iconic falls – I wonder if they shared the sense of anti-climax views that I felt.

On a bitterly cold day, we should have made for Niagara-by-the-lake for some poetic distractions to kill the time. Rumours of its beauty make me inclined to think that a visit there should outweigh one to its famous neighbour, but, sadly, this is only a whisper known by few and isn’t to be found all over the net. Instead, and foolishly, we made do with entertaining ourselves in Canada’s Las Vegas.

A trip up the skylon tower does provide a panoramic view of both falls and is a rather pleasantly to see the panorama without getting too cold. Of course, it has gimmicks – our Japanese and Chinese friends must be entertained! There is the inevitable and, these days, ubiquitous revolving restaurant to enjoy. Clearly not of those who wanted to spin while eating but who perhaps could have been tempted, we were ushered into a corner to enjoy a beer (I guess our lack of appetite and the fact that we were no more than potential business candidates meant that we were not deemed worthy of the environment). We enjoyed our Canadian beers, but their assumptions cost them dear as our bill could have been so much more.

We left in search of a pub (or sportsbar as they are called this side of the ocean) hoping to watch the football. We were sent to the playground of far too many. In hope more than anticipation we tried to find something that might show the footie. No success, we ended up in a casino bar. Here we received a warm welcome, from people thinking that they had found another couple of deluded humans hoping to win their fortune. I mean the odds really are stacked against you, aren’t they? Who did they think we were? A few drinks and, by now, some much-needed food were consumed while the staff tried to work out how to display the football on the TV!! It never materialised – something about TV rights issues. This was all very hard to believe when it’s the international community that pays so heavily for our football rights. Thankfully the time had come for our train out of there – a buddy in Toronto awaited before the main event was due to commence. Hastily we made tracks in the pouring rain for the station.

Niagara, never again.

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