Jasper Jewel

Is this the jewel in Canada’s crown? Jasper – what a place! We visited this place more than once on this trip. We stopped at Jasper on the railway odyssey, but this stop was extended somewhat as we arrived ahead of schedule. This stopover gave a glimpse of what was to come. We made our way back by car to make a stay and what had been earmarked as a potential favourite destination of the trip certainly became that.

Set in the heart of the Rockies, this gentle and timeless town is an absolute winner. It exhibits an endless alpine landscape of opportunity and, oh, how I wish that I had had more time! Those hiking tracks, river activities and wildlife wonders needed more time than I had allocated. How lucky Canadians are to have it as their backyard!

Stunning mountains dominate the skyline, beautifully covered in snow. How refreshing compared with, apparently, the modern, global appeal of skyscrapers and bright lights. Give me nature’s view over a cityscape every time. Whether it is snow on the peaks or the remains of glaciers I’ll leave that for the experts. What I do know is the destruction of these incredible formations caused by the human race. I must appreciate what is left behind as it is spell binding and strive to do something about preserving it.

Canada is blessed with lakes; Jasper is no different. Some of them are fed by glaciers. These lakes have the most exquisite turquoise-coloured waters. I managed to finally see these wonderful colours walking around lake Annette where the ice had melted. I also found lots of frozen lakes as we were in Canada early in the season.  Between the lake and the snow of mountains lie the vast amount of wildlife and trees, which, until you look closely or walk through them, you do not realise the multitude of trees that are there. It is a mind-blowing amount. It was great to see them all standing proud knowing full well that some, perhaps not these particular ones, will be used for building purposes. I thought of the years that it took for these to grow. Sustainability is the key. Hidden among them is a vast array of wildlife. Whisper it quietly, because if you are there you never know what you might see!

I’m ashamed to admit that our journeys into Jasper were by both train and car. Coupled with the plane journey to get to Canada in the first place we have contributed to the damage caused to this planet. Motivation and inspiration should be taken from two crazy souls who were passed on the Iceland parkway. They were cycling to Jasper. They certainly challenged me to think about future trips and how they can be more of an adventure and exploration rather than a tick box exercise to visit as many places as possible. To what extent have I joined in with those who jump out of coaches to take a photo and jump back in again for the next shot. Time is something more valuable than money, and the one thing that beats us all. Time management to give to and to get the best out of life is a real issue as far as I am concerned. We are here to enjoy what we see but to do so responsibly. A reassessment of the way I travel perhaps should be done to make me minimise my footprint on the world. Food for thought.

I shall leave you with some thoughts about my visit which were noted as I sat and looked at that view.

For a moment I felt a sense of freedom
The evils of a modern world – greed, power,
Destruction, globalism, commercialism –
Abated as nature presented a calming distraction

It takes more than a moment to appreciate the view,
Solace found in a wonderful yet peaceful landscape.
And how one views the scene depends on the viewer –
God’s creation or years of formation

As the shoots of spring were forming
The sun was shining
The birds were returning
The snow was melting

The sound of flowing water
Didn’t disturb the peaceful harmony
Birdsong the angelic voices that
Drowned the heavy beats of my heavy heart

The more you look the more you appreciate
But for how long will we be able?
Whisper it quietly for surely
It won’t be here for much longer

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Whistle stop Winnipeg

This great Canadian railway odyssey has thrown up many delightful charms and none more so than the City of Winnipeg. There is more to come.

Situated in the heart of Canada, you can begin to see why it’s such a strategic location. It’s remarkable to think I never really knew of its existence! It’s perhaps the combination of the lack of expectation and knowledge that give these delightful discoveries such unbridled joy.

Blessed in glorious spring sunshine but with rumours of -2°C outside the train, I disembarked and went off in search of new found discoveries. My time was limited as after all we were on a railway adventure. A quick dash soon led me to the river. The river provides the backdrop for most of the history associated with the city. In fact there is a confluence of two rivers (Red and Assiniboine) which is referred to locally as ‘The Forks’. It was here that I was able to capture the skyline of the city and found some prose about freedom based on gulls seen as a youngster with her mother at Provencher Bridge in a work entitled Street of Riches by Gabrielle Roy.

“Toward the middle of the Provencher Bridge,
Maman and I found ourselves surrounded by sea gulls;
they flew low over the Red River.
Maman took my hand and clasped it tight,
as though to convey to me a movement of her soul.
A hundred times a day Maman got a lift of joy from the world around us;
sometimes it was nothing more than the wind or the flight of a bird that delighted her.
Leaning on the parapet we watched the gulls for a long while.
And all of a sudden, on that bridge, Maman told me that she would like to be able to go whenever and wherever she might choose.”

Over on the other side I was immediately drawn to a graveyard housing a good number of grave stones and which led you along a path to a ruined church/cathedral! I was fascinated to see these ruins, the result of a fire that destroyed the building in the 1970s. A more modern church has been built behind the ruins which have remained as part of the architect’s new vision of the church, a phoenix from the ashes if you like.

To the right of this is a charming house, which is now a museum. Sat in front of it is a statue to Louis Riel. Louis led the Red Rebellion for the local provisional government against the growing number of newcomers from Eastern Canada. Garnet Wolseley was sent to crush the rebellion – there was no evidence of him here!! This rebellion resulted in Manitoba then becoming the fifth province of Canada.

As time was short, a quick dash along the river and back to the station was made. Around the concert area which led back to the train station there were some old Canadian Pacific carriages resting in the car park. Other parts of the city’s history which are relevant is Bloody Saturday (100th anniversary this year). After the First World War, the city had many men return form the war and looking for work. It was felt that opportunities had been taken by immigrants and this, coupled with a feeling that there had been profiteering from the war by many companies without passing on some of the benefits to the workforce leading to low wages led to the strike of 1919. This ended in tragedy when two people with non-Canadian sounding names were killed by the mounted Canadian police. So this beautiful stop provided some memorable moments and some information for my further interest. It shall be that inquisitive nature that shall lead me to explore this place further upon coming back – apparently the market is a must!!

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