Jasper Jewel

Is this the jewel in Canada’s crown? Jasper – what a place! We visited this place more than once on this trip. We stopped at Jasper on the railway odyssey, but this stop was extended somewhat as we arrived ahead of schedule. This stopover gave a glimpse of what was to come. We made our way back by car to make a stay and what had been earmarked as a potential favourite destination of the trip certainly became that.

Set in the heart of the Rockies, this gentle and timeless town is an absolute winner. It exhibits an endless alpine landscape of opportunity and, oh, how I wish that I had had more time! Those hiking tracks, river activities and wildlife wonders needed more time than I had allocated. How lucky Canadians are to have it as their backyard!

Stunning mountains dominate the skyline, beautifully covered in snow. How refreshing compared with, apparently, the modern, global appeal of skyscrapers and bright lights. Give me nature’s view over a cityscape every time. Whether it is snow on the peaks or the remains of glaciers I’ll leave that for the experts. What I do know is the destruction of these incredible formations caused by the human race. I must appreciate what is left behind as it is spell binding and strive to do something about preserving it.

Canada is blessed with lakes; Jasper is no different. Some of them are fed by glaciers. These lakes have the most exquisite turquoise-coloured waters. I managed to finally see these wonderful colours walking around lake Annette where the ice had melted. I also found lots of frozen lakes as we were in Canada early in the season.  Between the lake and the snow of mountains lie the vast amount of wildlife and trees, which, until you look closely or walk through them, you do not realise the multitude of trees that are there. It is a mind-blowing amount. It was great to see them all standing proud knowing full well that some, perhaps not these particular ones, will be used for building purposes. I thought of the years that it took for these to grow. Sustainability is the key. Hidden among them is a vast array of wildlife. Whisper it quietly, because if you are there you never know what you might see!

I’m ashamed to admit that our journeys into Jasper were by both train and car. Coupled with the plane journey to get to Canada in the first place we have contributed to the damage caused to this planet. Motivation and inspiration should be taken from two crazy souls who were passed on the Iceland parkway. They were cycling to Jasper. They certainly challenged me to think about future trips and how they can be more of an adventure and exploration rather than a tick box exercise to visit as many places as possible. To what extent have I joined in with those who jump out of coaches to take a photo and jump back in again for the next shot. Time is something more valuable than money, and the one thing that beats us all. Time management to give to and to get the best out of life is a real issue as far as I am concerned. We are here to enjoy what we see but to do so responsibly. A reassessment of the way I travel perhaps should be done to make me minimise my footprint on the world. Food for thought.

I shall leave you with some thoughts about my visit which were noted as I sat and looked at that view.

For a moment I felt a sense of freedom
The evils of a modern world – greed, power,
Destruction, globalism, commercialism –
Abated as nature presented a calming distraction

It takes more than a moment to appreciate the view,
Solace found in a wonderful yet peaceful landscape.
And how one views the scene depends on the viewer –
God’s creation or years of formation

As the shoots of spring were forming
The sun was shining
The birds were returning
The snow was melting

The sound of flowing water
Didn’t disturb the peaceful harmony
Birdsong the angelic voices that
Drowned the heavy beats of my heavy heart

The more you look the more you appreciate
But for how long will we be able?
Whisper it quietly for surely
It won’t be here for much longer

Center map

Baronial Banff

There is an undoubted link between the railways and the settlements in Canada. Banff is no exception. It’s a shame that arrival to Banff wasn’t by way of rail but by car. That is not to denigrate in any way an arrival by car. Perhaps we saw more of the amazing views than we would have done from the train as it makes it way down from Vancouver. The journey into Banff was certainly an arduous one, the drive from Vancouver being a monster of a drive. Was it worth it? Undoubtedly, yes! Would I do it again? A resounding no.

Everyone has surely heard of Banff. If you haven’t where have you been hiding? Pictures of the lakes have dominated travellers’ social media feeds for a long time and are always featured in the travel section of newspapers. It was the desire of my dear friend to visit the place. Knowing the time of the year I wasn’t as keen as those dreamy pictures probably weren’t going to be captured. The snow from wintry weather still affected the landscape. April is a bit too early for the thaw.

Perhaps it was due to the weather that I didn’t love this place as much as others. That said, I had heard another refer to the town as ‘nice but pretentious’. I had dreamed of canoeing those turquoise waters and hiking for a view of those snow topped mountains. Sadly, this will have to remain a distant dream and provide inspiration to return to this wonderful part of the world one day provided that is that the tacky tourist or global destruction or a combination of both doesn’t ruin it.

I was interested to find out that Banff became one of Canada’s first national parks in 1885. Although the area had been discovered centuries before by the native people, it was the railway workers who discovered the hot springs in 1883 and therefore set off to create the tourist town of Banff. The town is a combination of shops and eateries, whose survival relies on the tourists that visit the area. Sadly, this aspect was not at all appealing to me. I feel beauty isn’t in those artificial creations but the natural formation of the land on which they are built.

Step away from the touristy town centre and become one with nature. This is surely a memory and experience far greater than mindless entertainment provided by technology. A gentle walk up Tunnel Mountain provided some much-needed outdoor time after being cooped up in transport for so many days. A new friend was adopted as we made our way to the top stopping many times for pictures of the views. Pictures can never do it justice and I always end up taking too many. Does this perhaps mean that the view diminishes slightly as picture after picture is taken to share with the world? As social media, particularly Instagram, changes the way in which we visit these places, I am as guilty of that as the next person but am challenging the thought process and wondering whether I should have left the camera behind.

Dragging myself away from the top of the mountain, with a spring in my step, and fresh air in my lungs and a new sense of general wellbeing, I set off in search of other such delights. I stumbled upon a view point of the famous Banff Springs Hotel that was built by the railway. Such a beautiful monstrosity (a tad oxymoronic but hey ho) sat so peacefully surrounded by nature. Someone down there is surely capitalising on nature’s beauty. Perhaps inspiration was taken from Baronial castles in Scotland and a trip to visit similar landscapes closer to home is a must in the near future. I was dismayed on arrival at the river Bow to find bus loads of people arrive for the inevitable picture before hopping back on the bus. They, like me, were tourists with theirs being a hop on, hop off, conveyor belt type tourism. The industry has put in the aids to access and embellished the viewing points to encourage instant tourism devoid of any sense of adventure. We were there in April. What must it be like in July? I had tiny hopes of finding some water activities and I had to settle for climbing and walking around to find an idyllic spot.

There were parts of Banff that I didn’t see due to the wintry weather that would have perhaps appealed to my enthusiasm. Rather than trying to view these places by modern means, it will perhaps be more rewarding to put in the effort to use the greatest technology of them all, the human body. As I sit down to look at those mountain views, two things amaze me – the creation of what’s in front of me and secondly the mechanisms of the body. Two incredible things that I probably haven’t valued enough in my lifetime as there are distractions and a manic lifestyle that mean that they get ignored in the case of nature or abused in the case of the body. Perhaps it is as I leave that this place, with its mixture of unchanging beauty and its snapshot tourists trampling over it all, that it has caused me to further crystallise my thoughts and even inspired me more than I considered possible on first sight.

Maybe another time Banff…..